An aerial view of part of a double rainbow over Thorney and Muchelney surrounded by flood water in 2014.

Get tickets for talks about the future of water in Somerset

The Future of Water in Somerset is the main theme for a thought-provoking and enjoyable evening of talks and questions on Tuesday 14 May at the Somerset Rural Life Museum in Glastonbury. The event's being organised by Somerset Rivers Authority with the South West Heritage Trust. It incudes access to a new show of photographs by the renowned Somerset-based photographer Matilda Temperley, reflecting on ten years since the devastating floods of 2013-14.
Read the full story . . .

Ten years since the 2014 floods: resilience and adaptation a key part of Somerset’s future

It's 10 years since the wettest winter for 250 years left large swathes of Somerset underwater for weeks, devastating communities, businesses and farming. Much flood defence and risk management work has since taken place, including many schemes funded or part-funded by Somerset Rivers Authority (launched in 2015). Across Somerset, the impacts of climate change mean that resilience and adaptation to flood risks will gradually need to play a bigger part in Somerset’s future.
Read the full story . . .

“Very wet”: Somerset Levels and Moors briefing 5 January 2024

Storm Henk and heavy rainfall since the New Year mean that river levels are rising and the Somerset moors are very wet. Currently river levels are too high to allow pumping. The Environment Agency will begin pumping as soon as there is enough room in the main river channels to receive the flood water. Looking ahead, the weekend is forecast to be generally dry, with clearer weather in the long-term forecast. But there is now a lot of water in river networks, which will take time to work its way through catchments.
Read the full story . . .

“Extra pumps for four stations”: Somerset Levels and Moors briefing 14 December 2023

River levels are slowly dropping on the Somerset Levels and Moors, but the July to November period has been the fourth wettest since records began in 1871. Ground conditions are still wet and will remain responsive to further rainfall for some time to come. The Environment Agency is therefore proactively installing extra pumps at several stations - Long Load, Midelney, North Drain and Northmoor - to increase its capacity to empty the moors ahead of any change in the weather.
Read the full story . . .

“More pumps on the way”: Somerset Levels and Moors briefing 11 December 2023

As river levels stay high in the Brue, Parrett and Tone, additional pumps are going to be deployed by the Environment Agency at Westover and Huish Episcopi pumping stations. This is in readiness for when river levels drop. People in Langport are being asked not to block access to Westover pumping station when parking in that area. The Environment Agency is also monitoring the need for additional pumps at Middleney and Long Load pumping stations.
Read the full story . . .

“Further rain expected”: Somerset Levels and Moors briefing 6 December

The latest news from the Environment Agency about river levels and pumping operations in the Axe-Brue and Parrett-Tone catchments. The situation is being closely monitored as water moves through watercourses and rivers, following heavy rainfall earlier this week. A pump is being re-deployed at Elson's Clyse overnight on Thursday 7 December, after a drop-in session for the public at Moorland Village Hall.
Read the full story . . .

“Significant rainfall and impacts”: Somerset Levels and Moors briefing 4 December

After nearly seven centimetres of rain in one day, an Environment Agency update about flooding and prospects for the next few days. Plus: two public events for Somerset Levels and Moors residents at Burrowbridge on 5 December and Moorland on 7 December. The main subjects of these events are flooding and preparations for winter. Somerset Rivers Authority and Somerset Council representatives will also be at both of these drop-in sessions.
Read the full story . . .
Back To Top